Fundamental Nature of the Fine-Structure Constant

Fundamental Nature of the Fine-Structure Constant

Spiralby Michael A. Sherbon        Abstract: Arnold Sommerfeld introduced the fine-structure constant that determines the strength of the electromagnetic interaction. Following Sommerfeld, Wolfgang Pauli left several clues to calculating the fine-structure constant with his research on Johannes Kepler’s view of nature and Pythagorean geometry. The Laplace limit of Kepler’s equation in classical mechanics, the Bohr-Sommerfeld model of the hydrogen atom and Julian Schwinger’s research enable a calculation of the electron magnetic moment anomaly. Considerations of fundamental lengths such as the charge radius of the proton and mass ratios suggest some further foundational interpretations of quantum electrodynamics. Available at SSRN: 2380218

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Wolfgang Pauli and the Fine-Structure Constant

Wolfgang Pauli and the Fine-Structure Constant

                    by: Michael A. Sherbon

Wolfgang Pauli was influenced by Carl Jung and the Platonism of Arnold Sommerfeld, who introduced the fine-structure constant. Pauli’s vision of a World Clock is related to the symbolic form of the Emerald Tablet of Hermes and Plato’s geometric allegory otherwise known as the Cosmological Circle attributed to ancient tradition. With this vision Pauli revealed geometric clues to the mystery of the fine-structure constant that determines the strength of the electromagnetic interaction. A Platonic interpretation of the World Clock and the Cosmological Circle provides an explanation that includes the geometric structure of the pineal gland described by the golden ratio. In his experience of archetypal images Pauli encounters the synchronicity of events that contribute to his quest for physical symmetry relevant to the development of quantum electrodynamics.

SSRN: abstract=2147980

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The Philosopher’s Stone

The Philosopher’s Stone: A Quest for the Secrets of Alchemy

by Peter Marshall   “The Philosopher’s Stone is the Holy Grail

of alchemy, the ancient art of turning base metal into gold. Its magical and elemental power has fixated explorers, occultists and scientists for centuries. For the Philosopher’s Stone, it is said, holds the key, not only to making gold but also to deciphering the riddle of existence and unlocking the secret of eternal life.” Following such luminaries as Newton, Jung, St. Thomas Aquinas and Zosimus, who devoted most of their lives to searching for it, Peter Marshall set out to unearth the secrets of alchemy in the lands where it was traditionally practised. The result is a piece of historical, scientific and philosophical detection, as well as an exciting physical and spiritual adventure. Exploring the beliefs and practices, the myths and the symbols of the alchemists, Peter Marshall takes us on a journey into this arcane world.”

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Nature’s Information and Harmonic Proportion

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Nature’s Information and Harmonic Proportion

by Michael A. Sherbon

Abstract: The history of science is polarized by debates over Plato and Aristotle’s holism versus the atomism of Democritus and others. This includes the complementarity of continuous and discrete, one and the many, waves and particles, and analog or digital views of reality. The three-fold method of the Pythagorean paradigm of unity, duality, and harmony enables the calculation of fundamental physical constants required by the forces of nature in the formation of matter; thereby demonstrating Plato’s archetypal viewpoint.

papers.ssrn.com/abstract=1766049

SSRN Classics: Journal of Philosophical & Scientific Texts

 

 

 

 

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Mathematical Constants of Natural Philosophy

Mathematical Constants of Natural Philosophy

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Michael A. Sherbon    July 21, 2010

Abstract:

Plato’s theory of everything is an introduction to a Pythagorean natural philosophy that includes Egyptian sources. The Pythagorean Table and Pythagorean harmonics from the ancient geometry of the Cosmological Circle are related to symbolic associations of basic mathematical constants with the five elements of Plato’s allegorical cosmology: Archimedes constant, Euler’s number, the polygon circumscribing limit, the golden ratio, and Aristotle’s quintessence. Quintessence is representative of the whole, or the one in four, extraneously considered a separate element or fifth force. This relationship with four fundamental interactions or forces also involves the correlation of constants with the five Platonic solids: tetrahedron, hexahedron, octahedron, icosahedron, and dodecahedron. The values of several fundamental physical constants are also calculated, and a basic equation is given for a unified physical theory in the geometric universe of Plato’s natural philosophy.

 

papers.ssrn.com/abstract=1646568
SSRN Classics: Journal of Philosophical & Scientific Texts

 

 

 

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Classical Quintessence

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Classical Quintessence and the Cosmological Constant

by Michael A. Sherbon

SSRN Classics: Journal of Philosophical & Scientific Texts (12 July 2009)

Abstract: From the cosmology of classical quintessence and the Cosmological Circle of ancient geometry, quintessence is calculated as the primary fundamental physical constant. The role of the fine-structure constant in quantum electrodynamics is briefly discussed and the same value for inverse alpha, the inverse fine-structure constant found in previous work, is confirmed. Then the cosmological constant is calculated, confirming a recent theoretical prediction related to the fine-structure constant and the cosmological constant. ssrn.com/abstract=1433068

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